October 2014

Posted by Sara King BSc (Hons) MCIEEM on 31/10/2014

Ecosulis attended the Bristol University Internship Career’s Fair on 30 October 2014. The aim of the fair is to assist environmental and science students with their chosen career, and to offer placements to give potential ecologists relevant work experience.

Ecosulis work closely with several universities, including Bristol University, offering placements and interships to graduates and students studying an environmental degree, and with a passion for ecology.

The rapid progress of the Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) was clearly demonstrated to attendees of the Europe and Central Asia plenary meeting in Basel 22-23 September.  Whilst most attendees were government representatives, Dr Alan Feest from Ecosulis attended as a recognised researcher on the measurement of biodiversity. 

It is estimated that there are around 4,128 Sites of Specific Scientific Interest in England (SSSIs). With construction picking up across the UK there is a danger that building work and infrastructure projects could potentially disturb these sites. In the past identifying these areas and working around them could prove tricky and would require detailed assessments to be included in impact assessment. This is now aided by the introduction of a new online tool that allows developers and their consultants to see at a glance where these areas area and the risk of potential impact.
When people talk about wildlife and ecosystems they often talk of preserving them, although this is a limited view and is often typical of people and naturalists who are attached to habitats and species as they knew them in their lifetime only. This condition is often referred to as Shifting Baseline Syndrome and what is often not realised is that it is also possible to restore local habitats to the state they once were, to a state that is richer in biodiversity and healthier for people.