Blog

Today the rewilding and restoration space is characterised by an ever-growing number of inspirational stories, from Ecosulis's own projects through to the efforts of businesses, NGOs, academics, politicians and ordinary citizens across the globe. Here we present a selection of the latest and greatest.

140 Nature reserves to be rescued by wardens

Posted by Cain Blythe - CEnv MIEMA MIEEM MSc BSc (Hons) on 02/18/2011
It has been revealed in the Independent newspaper that wardens working in 140 state-run National Nature Reserves in England are looking to form their own mutual company.

Wichelstowe Wildlife News: Issue 2, February 2011 – Winter Works 2010/2011

Posted by Hannah Maben on 02/10/2011
Welcome to Wichelstowe Wildlife News where you will find all the latest information in respect to the habitats and species within the Wichelstowe urban extension to the south of Swindon. This second issue provides an outline of recent winter works undertaken in 2010/2011 including works relating to wildlife fencing, wildlife tunnels, pond management, pond creation, hedgerow management and tree planting.

Wichelstowe Wildlife News: Issue 1, February 2011 – Introduction and Ecological Works Undertaken to Date

Posted by Hannah Maben - BSc (Hons) MIEEM on 02/09/2011
Welcome to Wichelstowe Wildlife News where you will find all the latest information in respect to the habitats and species within the Wichelstowe urban extension to the south of Swindon. This first issue includes a brief introduction to Wichelstowe and a summary of ecological works undertaken to date.

Dr Alan Feest Confirmed as European Water Association Biodiversity Representative and Advisor to the European Commission

Posted by Sara King BSc (Hons) and Dr Alan Feest PhD FCIWEM MIEEM PGCE on 01/31/2011
Ecosulis is pleased to announce that Dr Alan Feest, our Scientific Advisor, has been appointed as biodiversity representative to the European Commission for the European Water Association (EWA). Alan will contribute to the Expert Network in Water, Marine and Biodiversity which is being set up by the European Commission

Big Tree Plant - New Type of Tree Planting Grant

Posted by Julian Burchby on 01/31/2011
This blog introduces the BIG TREE PLANT which will allocate £4.2 million over the next four years to encourage planting in the UK, in association with national tree planting organisations and local groups.

Watch Out for Water Voles – Part 2: Implementing Works Affecting Water Vole Habitat

Posted by Hannah Maben - BSc (Hons) MIEEM on 01/27/2011
This two-part Blog considers the practical implications of water vole and the protection it is afforded in respect to works affecting aquatic habitat, be it conservation, maintenance, management or development works. Part 2 of this Blog considers the displacement method in more detail, which is Ecosulis’s preferred method of mitigation where water voles are present and avoidance is not possible.

Watch Out for Water Voles – Part 1: Legal Considerations and Planning Works

Posted by Hannah Maben - BSc (Hons) MIEEM on 01/27/2011
This two-part Blog considers the practical implications of water vole and the protection it is afforded in respect to works affecting aquatic habitat, be it conservation, maintenance, management or development works. Part 1 provides a brief background to the legislation affording protection to water vole and its habitat, water vole ecology and the broad process in terms of considering this species when planning works including licensing.

Japanese Knotweed and Other Invasive Non-native Species

Posted by Sara King BSc (Hons) on 01/24/2011
Japanese knotweed is often the first invasive non-native species that our clients are familiar with. However, there are currently 56 invasive non-native plant species and 69 non-native animal species listed on Schedule 9 of the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 (as amended) in the UK. Invasive non-native species spread easily and are usually difficult to control. It is estimated by Defra that non-native species cost the UK around £2 billion a year, and they can have a significant impact on development and infrastructure projects. Ecosulis can provide a range of advice and experience for surveying and controlling a range of non-native invasive plant species, including Japanese knotweed, Indian balsam and giant hogweed

Ecosulis 2010 Blog Competition - Closing Date 31 January 2011

Posted by Hannah Maben - BSc (Hons) MIEEM on 01/19/2011
Ecosulis held an internal Blog writing competition in November 2010 and we would love your help in choosing a winner! All you need to do to participate is to read the Blogs and select your three favourite using the following links...

Lasius emarginatus (Olivier, 1792) (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) confirmed as a British species [Update]

Posted by Mike Williams BSc (Hons) AIEEM on 01/17/2011
In June 2008 Ecosulis discovered the first known colony of the ant Lasius emarginatus in mainland Britain. This blog provides an update regarding the status of the colony.

Badger Baitmarking Surveys – Why, When and What?

Posted by Hannah Maben - BSc (Hons) MIEEM on 01/14/2011
Developments that are likely to significantly affect a badger groups territory (for example direct habitat loss or severance) or cannot avoid damage or destruction of an important sett are likely to require baitmarking surveys to inform mitigation. This Ecosulis Blog considers when baitmarking is necessary and outlines the process involved in completing this work, including an outline of the timing implications associated with seasonal constraints, the planning system and licensing process in respect to badgers.

Great Crested Newt Mitigation Success for Ecosulis

Posted by James Tristram BSc (Hons) on 01/14/2011
2010 saw an end to a long term mitigation strategy designed and implemented by Ecosulis. The consultancy team were pleased to report back positive results for the scheme which saw an overall 50% rise in the great crested newt population since monitoring began.