Blogs

Posted by Daniel Allen on 8/05/2019

The UK parliament has declared a "climate emergency". As a nature-based climate solution grounded in rewilding principles, natural grazing could (and should) play a role in averting disaster. 

 

The Tauros, derived from an extinct species of wild cattle called the auroch, has been successfully used as a natural grazer in a number of European rewilding projects. Photo: Daniel Allen  

 

Posted by Daniel Allen on 11/04/2019

 The report, compiled by Ecosulis for WWF Scotland, featured in a wide range of UK media, including BBC.co.uk, The Herald, Good Morning Scotland and STV.

The full WWF press release can be found below. 

 

 

Posted by Sara King BSc (Hons) MCIEEM on 3/04/2019

Climate change will have a range of significant impacts on people, as well as our planet. It will also change our biodiversity and natural processes globally. Changes in climate and weather, and rising temperatures will change our ecosystems and species beyond recognition. In many cases, wildlife will need to commute north or to habitats higher in elevation to survive this change, and we will see more exotic species reaching our shores to adapt to the change in conditions and habitat types.

Posted by Daniel Allen on 19/02/2019

The groundbreaking app, which helps users measure changes in biodiversity quality, beat off strong competition to win its category at the BusinessGreen Technology Awards 2018 in December.  This was followed with further recognition at the FSB (Federation of Self Employed & Small Businesses) Celebrating Small Business Awards 2019 in February.

 

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Posted by Sara King BSc (Hons) MCIEEM on 1/02/2019

Nature in the United Kingdom is in decline. Populations of priority species have decreased by more than 60% since the 1970s, and there is no evidence of a reversal in this trend. UK landscapes are under more pressure than ever to deliver housing, infrastructure and food. Several species, including once common animals such as the European hedgehog, are in danger of disappearing forever. We need to ensure that policy and conservation methods protect the best of the biodiversity that we have left within the UK.