Ecosulis
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Case Studies

Highways & Transport

Project Name:
Aerial Tree Roost Inspection for Bats - Congleton Link Road
Client:
Jacobs Engineering
Year:
Jan 01, 2014
Keywords:
Bats in Trees, Bat Aerial Tree Roost Survey, Climbing Survey
Summary:
In 2014 Ecosulis undertook aerial tree roost inspections for bats. The 50 trees were proposed for felling to allow for the construction of the new Congleton Link ...

In 2014 Ecosulis undertook aerial tree roost inspections for bats. The 50 trees were proposed for felling to allow for the construction of the new Congleton Link Road.

The Congleton Link Road is proposed to improve traffic levels in Congleton, by linking the west of Congleton with the A534 and the A34. The aim is to also improve the local economy and the wider strategy of development and growth in the area.

Proposed Link Road

During the aerial tree roost inspections for bats, 50 mature trees on the site had been assessed as providing suitable opportunities for roosting bats based on ground assessments. Further inspections of the features were required to fully assess the potential roosting opportunities, as well as search for evidence of roosting bats.

One of our specialist tree climbing and licensed bat ecologist teams undertook the surveys as part of a wider survey programme. Features were inspected using high quality endoscopes and torches and all characteristics of the cavities are recorded.

The benefit of the aerial tree roost inspections for bats to our clients is that the survey allows for trees assessed as having high potential for bats from the ground can be downgraded once the potential roost features have been inspected in detail.

The significance of this is that these surveys, in accordance with the current best practice guidelines (http://www.bats.org.uk/pages/batsurveyguide.html), reduces the requirement for more expensive bat emergence and swarming surveys, thus offering significant reductions in the overall cost and time requirements for bat surveys.

Trees were felled following the aerial tree roost inspections for bats if no evidence of roosting bats was recorded.

Two pipistrelle bats were found roosting within a hazard beam in the branch of a mature oak tree (see images). As a result, the tree was retained and protected during the works. Bat roosts are protected under The Conservation of Species and Habitats Regulations 2010 from damage and destruction. 

Pipistrelle Bat Roosting in Cavity

 

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