Cain Blythe - CEnv MIEMA MCIEEM MSc BSc (Hons)

At a time that most ecological consultants are out undertaking great crested newt surveys and developers are squeezing in last minute commissions for 2016 the BBC News and Ecosulis are also considering what the future holds for this European Protected Species (EPS). 

Cain Blythe and Daniel Allen cover two revealing articles for Geographical magazine as part of Rewilding Week:

Bear Necessities: http://geographical.co.uk/nature/wildlife/item/1389-bear-necessities

Fewer than 50 Marsican brown bears roam the Apennine Mountains of central Italy. Daniel Allen and Cain Blythe investigate whether new protection measures can bring Italy’s largest carnivore back from the edge.

Over the last 25 years Ecosulis has developed a tried and tested method for establishing reedbeds in a variety of situations. Our experts know that each site has its unique set of challenges and these need to be considered systematically in order to ensure that you can establish a successful reedbed. Where we have been commissioned by clients to repair or restore failed reedbeds, we have identified factors that are often not considered by those installing them. This article outlines some of those key issues and provides solutions to them. 
 
 
It is estimated that there are around 4,128 Sites of Specific Scientific Interest in England (SSSIs). With construction picking up across the UK there is a danger that building work and infrastructure projects could potentially disturb these sites. In the past identifying these areas and working around them could prove tricky and would require detailed assessments to be included in impact assessment. This is now aided by the introduction of a new online tool that allows developers and their consultants to see at a glance where these areas area and the risk of potential impact.
When people talk about wildlife and ecosystems they often talk of preserving them, although this is a limited view and is often typical of people and naturalists who are attached to habitats and species as they knew them in their lifetime only. This condition is often referred to as Shifting Baseline Syndrome and what is often not realised is that it is also possible to restore local habitats to the state they once were, to a state that is richer in biodiversity and healthier for people.
 

Ecosulis congratulate Dr Alan Feest their Research Director on his recognition as a leading UK ecologist following his review and interview by the Chartered Institute of Ecologists and Ecological Managers. Dr Feest who is already a Fellow of CIWEM joins an elite group of chartered ecologists whose life-time contribution to the furtherance of ecology in the UK is being recognised by this new accreditation. 

A recent report was commissioned by Defra. Entitled “The Biodiversity Segmentation Scoping Study”. The idea behind the study was to ensure that any engagement with people is focused and relevant, and to encourage more people to engage in biodiversity by 2020. They compiled a report with a mix of data and feedback from targeted groups to learn how to ensure people want to learn about biodiversity and take an active role in projects/community areas.

 

Levels of engagement were defined as follows-

 

A study has been compiled for the Biodiversity 2020 Terrestrial Biodiversity Group (TBG) which focused on 159 National Character Areas and the potential to add or restore habitats within these sites. As well as looking at how to achieve this, they assessed prescriptions to ensure that habitats could be restored without environmental conflicts of interest (for example saltmarsh creation on the same space as floodland grazing).

 

The Breeding Bird Survey is a nationwide survey supported by the British Trust for Ornithology (BTO), Joint Nature Conservation Committee (JNCC) and the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB). As well as monitoring the population of birds, this survey also serves as a way of assessing the overall health of the countryside in general.

 

The RSPB, the Chartered Institute of Ecology and Environment Management and the Royal Town Planning Institute have published a report highlighting the importance of spatial planning and offering recommendations in order to ensure that development is sustainable and enhances the natural environment.

The report resulted in 12 principles created to highlight effective planning and to minimise damage to the environment-