bat surveys

Posted by Ecosulis Consulting Team on 3/02/2016
The Third Edition of the Bat Conservation Trust Good Practice Guidelines (sponsored by Ecosulis) have just been released. Here is an overview of what you need to know, and how it may affect your upcoming projects.

 

Bat surveys are usually required to inform planning applications for the site, and range from roost emergence/swarming surveys to bat activity surveys.

The key changes within the guidelines include:

 

Posted by Annie Hatt BSc (Hons) on 6/04/2016

In March this year I was lucky enough to be enrolled on a Tree Climbing and Aerial Rescue course at Bridgwater College, Cannington. Running up to the course I was fortunate to have the support of a colleague Ben, from our ecological consultancy team, who already had his Tree Climbing qualification and is an experienced climber. He gave me a great deal of insight prior to the course, however, nothing could prepare me for the physical work that was involved!

Posted by Annie Hatt on 13/01/2016

It’s no secret bats are known, by some, as pests ‘invading’ homes and terrifying families. Blood sucking, ugly, diseased creatures often found in grave yards or swarming around haunted houses. Searching the internet, it is astounding the number of ‘pest’ control companies talking in this way about bats. In all fairness as an ecologist who surveys bats on a regular basis and completely intrigued by their behaviour, my opinion is a completely bias one.

Posted by Ben Mitchell BSc (Hons) MCIEEM on 14/12/2015

Grey long-eared bats are one of the UKs rarest bat species and their range was considered to be restricted to the south western coast of England only; however, a recent update from Natural England reveals just how far north they have colonised. Quite the opposite is true of the closely related brown long eared bat as it is one of our most common and widespread bat species in the UK.

Posted by Alice Chaimberlain on 2/11/2015

I was first introduced to Ecosulis at Bristol University’s Internship career fair back in October 2014. At that time I hadn’t even heard of ecological consultancy as a career option, but after talking to staff I was keen to find out more and get involved.

Now I’ve reached the end of my internship and although I still have much more to learn, my summer at Ecosulis has allowed me to explore many different aspects of ecological consultancy from research collection, surveying, mapping and report writing whilst getting involved with conservation directly to protect British wildlife.

Posted by Marc Anderton on 17/02/2015

Ecosulis have recently completed a large scale infrastructure project in Lancashire. The primary focus of the job was to climb and inspect mature trees to assess the potential of tree cavities to support roosting bats.

The work was undertaken by Mark Anderton and Ben Mitchell (licensed bat ecologist) and once up in the tree canopy, the principle role of the inspection involved using an endoscope to inspect the full extent of the cavity. The first stage is evidently checking for the presence or absence of roosting bats, although no bats were recorded in this instance.

Posted by Sara King BSc (Hons) MCIEEM on 26/01/2015

Natural England have recently changed their licensing process, which is now more stringent and requires an increased level of detail. Method statements associated with licence documents are legally binding and must be adhered to. Natural England are still experiencing delays processing licence applications.

Natural England have previously raised concerns over some consultants advice in respect to when a mitigation licence is required.  Specifically these relate to:

Posted by Sara King BSc (Hons) MCIEEM on 3/11/2014

Natural England is planning to launch a new development bat licence. The Bat Low Impact Licence is designed to simplify the licensing of certain bat projects and would streamline licence applications for schemes that have a low impact on bat roosts. This would include impacts on small roosts of the more widespread bats, such as works affecting a summer transitory roost for one or two individual common pipistrelle bats.

Posted by Marc Anderton on 15/09/2014

Priory Farm is located within the rural landscape of the Wansdyke District and consists of four conjoined barns, which were due for renovation. During the ecological surveys in 2010, three of the four barns had evidence of brown long-eared and common pipistrelle bats, whilst a single lesser horseshoe bat was also recorded within one of the barns.