biodiversity

Posted by Tamzin Wood on 26/10/2016

The damaging effect humans have had on natural resources has been more pronounced in the last half-a-century with 60% of the world's biodiversity being decimated. Severe climate change has been one of the fall-outs of this destruction of nature by man and one that we need to reverse. The UK hasn't been spared the effects of such changes as revealed by the State of Nature report recently published. Since the 1970s the UK has witnessed one of the highest losses of biodiversity on the planet.

Posted by Sarah Booley on 7/04/2015

Ecosulis has been engaging with clients about biodiversity valuation and the principle of No Net Loss through our programme of Continued Professional Development (CPD) presentations. We have recently been invited to speak at the offices of some of our largest clients such as BAM Nuttall to provide further information on these principles.

Posted by Sarah Booley on 30/03/2015

Earlier this year Natural England approved a licence to allow a family of beavers which had been living along the River Otter in Devon to remain in the wild (click here for more information). Issued to Devon Wildlife Trust who are responsible for managing the beavers this five year licence was subject to a number of conditions. A key condition was that the beavers on site are tested to confirm that they are European beavers and are free from parasites.

Posted by Sara King BSc (Hons) MCIEEM on 26/02/2015

Technology and biodiversity are two concepts that are usually viewed as polar opposites. However, the source of technical advances are often inspired from the natural world. Species in particular that have evolved to a certain role or niche provide unique opportunities for us to learn and develop technology and materials. Maintaining high levels of biodiversity will protect the vast range of species and their evolutionary functions, some of which could be utilised to improve our way of life.

Posted by Suzi Day and Cain Blythe on 17/02/2015

In 1990, Ecosulis was a family owned business set up by Dave and Ali Green. Ecosulis was run from the family home and grew by addressing clients needs at the time, by offering applied ecological knowledge, technical capability and a strong commercial awareness.

Over the twenty five years since, the business has expanded and has a presence throughout the UK and offices in Bath, Exeter, Monmouth, Chester and London. The HQ is based in a 3,000sq ft Rickyard (seed store) located between Bristol and Bath.

Posted by Sara King BSc (Hons) MCIEEM on 9/02/2015

Bristol has been awarded European Green Capital for 2015, and has launched its programme to celebrate this. Features range from recycling initiatives to sustainable architecture and biodiversity. There are a whole range of events that are open to members of the public to get involved.  This includes a range of biodiversity enhancements, including floating harbours, details on birdfeeders and lichens and plant collections.

Posted by Sara King BSc (Hons) MCIEEM on 30/01/2015

Natural England have approved a licence to allow a family of beavers recorded in the River Otter in Devon to remain in the wild. A licence will be issued to Devon Wildlife Trust to manage the release of wild beavers currently present in the river catchment on a five year trial basis. This licence will be subject to several conditions, and the Wildlife Trust will have to be sure that the beavers present are European beavers free of parasites.

Posted by Sara King BSc (Hons) MCIEEM on 31/10/2014

Ecosulis attended the Bristol University Internship Career’s Fair on 30 October 2014. The aim of the fair is to assist environmental and science students with their chosen career, and to offer placements to give potential ecologists relevant work experience.

Ecosulis work closely with several universities, including Bristol University, offering placements and interships to graduates and students studying an environmental degree, and with a passion for ecology.

Posted by Natalie Cross on 22/07/2013

Bees and apples have a symbiotic relationship. Bees pollinate the flowers, allowing the fruit to grow – good news for the cider companies – and the apple trees themselves provide pollen and nectar early in the year, which is great for the bees as it gives them food. In the UK, 70% of our food crops are pollinated by bees, so they are crucial in our society.