biodiversity 2020

Posted by Sarah Booley on 7/04/2015

Ecosulis has been engaging with clients about biodiversity valuation and the principle of No Net Loss through our programme of Continued Professional Development (CPD) presentations. We have recently been invited to speak at the offices of some of our largest clients such as BAM Nuttall to provide further information on these principles.

Posted by Sara King BSc (Hons) MCIEEM on 27/08/2014

Himalayan Balsam is a non-native invasive species, and is commonly found along river banks and watercourses. The species is listed in Schedule 9 of the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981, under which it is an offence to plant or otherwise cause to grow the plant in the wild. The species spreads quickly on sites as it out-competes native wildlife and spreads rapidly.  The plant spreads using its seed pods, which explode when touched scattering seeds up to 7m away.  Seeds are also spread by water and may remain viable within the soil for up to two years (Environment Agency, 2010). 

A recent report was commissioned by Defra. Entitled “The Biodiversity Segmentation Scoping Study”. The idea behind the study was to ensure that any engagement with people is focused and relevant, and to encourage more people to engage in biodiversity by 2020. They compiled a report with a mix of data and feedback from targeted groups to learn how to ensure people want to learn about biodiversity and take an active role in projects/community areas.

 

Levels of engagement were defined as follows-