Biodiversity Indicators

Posted by Sara King BSc (Hons) MCIEEM on 20/07/2016

Scotland is one of the wildest places in the UK, with mountains, lochs and woodland extending out for miles. It is where the first beaver reintroduction trial sites were established in the UK; where pine martens roam and osprey soar through the skies. Experiencing these areas allows you to believe that Lynx, elk and wolves could be reintroduced to these areas more successfully than in southern England, for example.

 

Posted by Sarah Booley on 23/02/2016

To provide an update on the current and emerging trends in biodiversity the Joint Nature Conservation Committee (JNCC) has assessed 24 different indicators. This aims to provide a clear way to identify and address problems facing biodiversity in the UK. These indicators have been based on a total of fifty measures and the full report can be found here.

Posted by Annie Hatt on 27/01/2016

Alan is a world leader in the measurement of biodiversity, creator of a computer program which can estimate biodiversity quality in a range of taxa, researcher in a number of fields and CIEEM Chartered Ecologist. Alan works with Ecosulis as a scientific advisor and non-executive director, as well as a Senior Research Fellow of the Faculty of Engineering at Bristol University. Previously he was the course Director of the Bristol University MSc. Water and Environmental Management.

Posted by Sara King BSc (Hons) MCIEEM on 22/10/2015

Beavers often get bad press for being the cause of flooding, and this is one of the key factors affecting the decision of whether to reintroduce beavers to Britain’s waterways. Heavy rain has caused flooding in Alyth Burn in Scotland, and many theories have linked this flooding to the presence of beavers in the area.

A “one in 200 year flood” occurred this summer and this caused extensive flash flooding within the village of Alyth, leaving homes without power.

Posted by Sarah Booley on 7/04/2015

Ecosulis has been engaging with clients about biodiversity valuation and the principle of No Net Loss through our programme of Continued Professional Development (CPD) presentations. We have recently been invited to speak at the offices of some of our largest clients such as BAM Nuttall to provide further information on these principles.

Posted by Sara King BSc (Hons) MCIEEM on 9/02/2015

Bristol has been awarded European Green Capital for 2015, and has launched its programme to celebrate this. Features range from recycling initiatives to sustainable architecture and biodiversity. There are a whole range of events that are open to members of the public to get involved.  This includes a range of biodiversity enhancements, including floating harbours, details on birdfeeders and lichens and plant collections.

Posted by Sara King BSc (Hons) MCIEEM on 20/01/2015

Ecosulis recently attended the Oxford University 2015 Biosymposium 2015 which focused on the functions and values of biodiversity. This subject has a wide expanse of viewpoints and information associated with it, from biologists and biochemists, to economist and philosophers. Flooded with information and lively debate from all viewpoints, the symposium supported an array of debate and discussion on the subject. This can make it quite difficult to see a way forward, and a way to make a difference.

The rapid progress of the Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) was clearly demonstrated to attendees of the Europe and Central Asia plenary meeting in Basel 22-23 September.  Whilst most attendees were government representatives, Dr Alan Feest from Ecosulis attended as a recognised researcher on the measurement of biodiversity. 

When people talk about wildlife and ecosystems they often talk of preserving them, although this is a limited view and is often typical of people and naturalists who are attached to habitats and species as they knew them in their lifetime only. This condition is often referred to as Shifting Baseline Syndrome and what is often not realised is that it is also possible to restore local habitats to the state they once were, to a state that is richer in biodiversity and healthier for people.