habitat restoration

Posted by Dr Paul Jepson on 18/11/2018

The UK government recently stated its ambition to "leave our environment in a better state than we inherited it", and to "not just protect and conserve, but enhance and restore habitats and landscapes". Adopting the slogan "Protect the best, recover the rest", unifies these ambitions. We not only need to protect the best regulations, policies and natural areas developed to date, but also forge ahead and engage new audiences in new conservation narratives suited to an era of accelerating change. 

Posted by James Edwards on 27/01/2016

Ecosulis where tasked with the removal of 70 large conifer trees as part of a housing development in Tetbury, Gloucestershire. The project would involve two men on the ground with chainsaws, an excavator with tree shears and a Dutch Dragon Chipper. The trees would be dismantled using the tree shears and the timber chipped to be used as mulch at a later date.

Posted by Sara King BSc (Hons) MCIEEM on 30/01/2015

Natural England have approved a licence to allow a family of beavers recorded in the River Otter in Devon to remain in the wild. A licence will be issued to Devon Wildlife Trust to manage the release of wild beavers currently present in the river catchment on a five year trial basis. This licence will be subject to several conditions, and the Wildlife Trust will have to be sure that the beavers present are European beavers free of parasites.

A study has been compiled for the Biodiversity 2020 Terrestrial Biodiversity Group (TBG) which focused on 159 National Character Areas and the potential to add or restore habitats within these sites. As well as looking at how to achieve this, they assessed prescriptions to ensure that habitats could be restored without environmental conflicts of interest (for example saltmarsh creation on the same space as floodland grazing).